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Tales of Missionary Adventure

Learn from the adventures of yesterday's Pioneers

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Marti Wade

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Published on 

December 21, 2021

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Check out this article, Tales of Missionary Adventure: Glimpse the lives of pioneer missionaries in tales of adventure from the Arctic Circle and the coral islands of Fiji to the Himalayan plateau of Tibet.

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Did you know? From one century to another, the missionary task remains essentially the same! Our new book, Fire & Ice: Missionary Adventures of the 1800s, traces common threads in tales of missionary adventure from the 19th century. Glimpse the lives of pioneer missionaries and local Christians from the Arctic Circle to just beyond the southern tip of Patagonia and from the coral islands of Fiji to the Himalayan plateau of Tibet.

The diversity of those God called and equipped to carry out His worldwide mission in the 19th century is as staggering as the variety of places He sent them. Kapi’olani, a Hawaiian chief, climbed a volcano to prove the power of her God. George Mackay, a Canadian, pulled teeth in Taiwan to make the same point. Coley Patteson and Allen Gardiner died on two beaches 7,500 miles apart for the same reason. They believed the gospel of Jesus Christ is for every person on earth.

  • Fire & Ice condenses and updates for modern readers John C. Lambert’s 1907 text, The Romance of Missionary Heroism.
  • Pioneers-USA President Steve Richardson wrote a foreword for this edition.
  • Fire & Ice also includes an epilogue based on C.S. Lewis’s thoughtful response to the question, “Why read old books?”

You won’t find any perfect models to emulate here. But you might find a faith that convicts, courage that inspires and adventures that excite you to strike out on a similar path of missionary intention. If you do, you’ll find yourself in good—if unusual—company. The unity of purpose and faith among God’s people across the centuries stands out all the more for the diversity of our backgrounds and circumstances.

Get your copy! The ebook is free. You can also get the 134-page paperback from Amazon.

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<p class="rich-text-callout"><strong>See Also: </strong><a href="#"><em>Discerning Your Calling: How Do You Know If God Is Leading You to Serve Cross Culturally?</em></a></p>

Take the next step

Want more missionary adventure stories?

Check out Treachery on the Twisted River, an adaptation of the 1974 book Peace Child, or read an excerpt.

Get our updated version of John C. Paton’s Thirty Years Among South Sea Cannibals, first published in 1889.

Items May Have Shifted tells the stories of four missionary families whose ministries were disrupted, and how God brought them into new places of fruitfulness.

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